Showing 586-600 of 755

  • PFAS exposure may increase risk of breast cancer

    News

    24 Oct 2019 | EWG News

    To reduce the risk of breast cancer and other health impacts from PFAS, Congress should include in the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2020 provisions that would quickly phase out the use of PFAS in military firefighting foam, reduce industrial discharges of PFAS, require reporting and monitoring for PFAS in ground and surface water, and jump-start the cleanup process under Superfund.

  • Dr. Phil Brown talks PFAS contamination and ongoing research

    News

    23 Oct 2019 | Northeastern University

    “It’s a big deal,” Brown says. “You put all this together and it’s the biggest chemical contamination issue in many, many years.” The important part, he says, is to regulate these chemicals as a class, rather than individually. Otherwise, each of the roughly 4,700 chemicals would need to be investigated separately, even if they had only minor molecular differences. And since the health effects are long-term problems like cancer, these studies could take decades.

  • 10 toxic ‘forever chemicals’ found in Louisville, KY, tap water

    News

    22 Oct 2019 | EWG News

    The highest level of any single PFAS detected in the EWG sample collected in Louisville was 22 ppt of a compound known as GenX. It is a replacement chemical for PFOA, which was used to make Teflon before U.S. manufacturers phased it out of production under pressure from the EPA. The EPA’s research has found that GenX is nearly as toxic as the PFOA it replaced, and DuPont, its original manufacturer, has provided test results to the EPA showing that GenX caused cancer in lab animals.

  • Victoria, Australia: Interim Position Statement on PFAS

    Policy

    22 Oct 2019

    The EPA in Victoria, Australia adopts precautionary interim PFAS management standards while waiting on national regulation.

  • Temporal Trends (1981-2013) of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances and total fluorine in Baltic cod (Gadus morhua)

    Science

    22 Oct 2019 | Environ. Toxicol. Chem.

    Decrease body length was associated with PFDoDA and FOSA exposure.

  • Clean drinking water options for Hoosick Falls considered

    News

    21 Oct 2019 | Bennington Banner

    Connecting to the existing Troy system was seen as the most expensive, at $48.5 million; connecting to a new untreated surface water source from the Tomhannock, at $34.4 million; continued filtering of existing village wells plus a remediation system for contaminants at McCaffrey Street, $10.1 million; development of a new village well water sources, at $6.9 million, and continued use of filtering alone at the existing village wells at $6.3 million. Comments on the report will be accepted until Nov. 18.

  • Data derived Extrapolation Factors for developmental toxicity: A preliminary research case study with perfluorooctanoate (PFOA)

    Science

    21 Oct 2019 | Regul Toxicol Pharmacol

    PFOA derived data was used the develope a standard for evaluating analytical PFAS results.

  • Uptake of Poly- and Perfluoroalkyl Substances at the Air-Water Interface

    Science

    21 Oct 2019 | Environ. Sci. Technol.

    The mobility of PFAS in soil was investigated to aid remediation efforts.

  • Erin Brockovich sounds alarm over PFAS after more Queensland sites revealed

    News

    20 Oct 2019 | ABC News

    More than 60 sites in Queensland are believed to be contaminated by PFAS. A university campus and a residential development are being built on two of the contaminated sites. Erin Brockovich says Australia is behind in dealing with the issue.

  • Here’s what Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s new PFAS water rules mean for Michigan

    News

    16 Oct 2019 | Bridge Michigan

    Michigan has taken a major step toward regulating dangerous PFAS chemicals in drinking water supplies. The final rule could be adopted by April 2020, but it must first clear an administrative review that includes consideration by the Environmental Rules Review Committee, a controversial panel that GOP lawmakers created last year to check the governor’s power.

  • Draft NTP Technical Report on Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of PFOA

    Policy

    15 Oct 2019

    NTP is holding a peer-review of draft Technical Reports on toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of HMB and PFOA and will hold a webcast on Dec. 12, 2019 at 10 AM Eastern (Registration is required). Written comments are due on Nov. 20, 2019. Oral comment registration deadline is Dec. 3, 2019.

  • ‘Dark Waters’ brings awareness to PFAS water contamination litigation

    News

    15 Oct 2019 | Legal Examiner

    A new movie scheduled to be released in November 2019, follows the story of how the American company DuPont knowingly poisoned 70,000 residents for decades. Currently, lawsuit against DuPont, 3M, and other companies are being filled for their alleged role in other water contamination crisis.

  • Governor DeWine issues order to analyze PFAS in Ohio’s drinking water

    News

    15 Oct 2019 | JD Supra

    Ohio EPA and ODH have been directed to develop an “action plan” by December 1, 2019, with the focus of testing public and private water systems. The governor’s order specifically notes that water supplies “near known sources of PFAS, such as firefighting training sites and manufacturing facilities” are to be analyzed.

  • Dietary Habits Related to Food Packaging and Population Exposure to PFASs

    Science

    11 Oct 2019 | Envir. Health Pers.

    A study found the consumption of meals from fast-food restaurants associated with higher PFAS blood levels and lower with food prepared and eaten at home.

  • ‘Forever chemicals’ are in your popcorn—and your blood

    News

    10 Oct 2019 | Wired

    According to a recently published peer-reviewed study, the more often people eat at home, the lower their level of PFAS chemicals. Also, people who reported eating microwave popcorn had significantly higher levels of four types of PFAS. Additionally, the study linked PFAS levels in blood to a diet high in shellfish, which can accumulate those chemicals from contaminated water.